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Adult and Senior Comprehensive Eye Exam (Morden)

Adult & Senior Comprehensive Eye Exam (Morden)

Understanding Our Eye Health Assessment Process
Your eyes tell you a lot. They tell your optometrist how well you should see but also aspects of your overall health.

  • Your eye exam will begin with a series of pre-tests to learn as much as possible about your eyes.
  • Your optometrist will review the data before completing your comprehensive assessment with you.

Focal Point Doctors

A trusted relationship with your eye doctor is the best way to monitor changes over time. It’s our privilege to be your partner in eye health.

Detailed Pre-test

Our team will carry out a series of detailed tests to help us get as much information as possible about your eyes before you see your optometrist. Please click on the link for a detailed description of each.

1. Lifestyle Analysis
Lifestyle Questionnaire

Through lifestyle analysis your optometrist and eyewear consultants can determine the perfect lens for your needs and prescription allowing you to experience optimal vision and function.

2.  i.Profiler Plus
3.  Lensometry
4.  Eye Pressure (NCT and iCare)
5.  Frequency Doubling Technology (FDT)
6.  Colour Vision
Ishihara Colour Test

The Ishihara colour test, which consists of a series of pictures of colored spots, is the test most often used to diagnose red–green color deficiencies.

Farnsworth D15 Colour Test

A more in-depth test that can be used is the Farnsworth D15. Each D15 set contains a reference disc and fifteen numbered discs, which make up an incomplete color circle. Following an attempt to sequentially arrange the discs by the patient, evaluation determines red-green or yellow-blue deficiencies.

7.  Depth Perception (Stereoacuity)
Stereo Fly

Stereoacuity is a measure of fine depth discrimination. This test has proven to be an effective and easy-to-use method of screening vision for all ages. They help to identify vision problems and conduct stereopsis, amblyopia, suppression, and strabismus testing, each of which can impede a child’s development and performance.

8.  Corneal Pachymetry (New patients)
Pachymeter

Corneal pachymetry is the process of measuring the thickness of the cornea. A pachymeter is a medical device used to measure the thickness of the eye’s cornea. It is useful in screening for patients suspected of developing glaucoma among other uses.

9.   Optomap California
10.  Lipiscan (19-60)
11.  Macular OCT (60+)

Adult and Senior Eye Exam

After your pre-tests, your optometrist will use the detailed data to complete your comprehensive vision and eye health exam.

1. Visual Acuities, Eye Coordination and Visual Perception

Your optometrist will evaluate how well you are seeing with and without glasses. When you have two eyes, teamwork is important. Your optometrist will examine how well your eyes work together and how they process visual information (colour, depth).

2.  Eyeglass prescription check

Using a phoropter your optometrist will determine the combination of lenses that will provide the best visual acuity

3.  Ocular Health

Using a biomicroscope and other hand help instruments your optometrist can view the external and internal structures of your eye.

Many eye and vision problems have no obvious signs or symptoms, so you might not know a problem exists. With a full view of your ocular health, your optometrist can detect problems earlier. Early diagnosis and treatment of eye problems can help prevent vision loss.

Additional specialized testing may be required if a health issue is suspected.

Child Eye Exams

The Canadian Association of Optometrists recommends that babies have their first eye examination between six and nine months of age. This is an important time to ensure eyes are healthy, eye and muscle movements and alignment are developing properly, and the eyes are focusing together. An accurate and complete eye exam can be performed without the need to read the eye chart. Your optometrist will test for nearsightedness (myopia), farsightedness (hyperopia), astigmatism, eye movement, and eye health.

There are a few ways to make this first visit more enjoyable:

  • Work around fussy times.
  • Schedule the appointment at a time when baby is generally relaxed and happy

By age 3, your optometrist should reassess your child’s visual system to confirm the absence of any eye disease, as well as monitor the continued growth and efficiency of visual skill development. This is also the examination where eye muscle problems such as crossed-eyes (strabismus) and lazy eye (amblyopia) are carefully assessed.

Amblyopia, or lazy eye, is the loss or lack of development of vision in an eye that is healthy. Amblyopia can be caused by crossed-eyes (strabismus), unequal refractive error, farsightedness or nearsightedness, or a physical obstruction like a cataract. The brain “learns” to see with the good eye only, and the other eye grows weaker from disuse. It is estimated that 2 – 4% of all children have amblyopia. Amblyopia is responsible for more cases of vision loss in children than all other ocular diseases and traumas combined. If detected and treated at an early age, amblyopia will often resolve completely.

Tests for Children

Your optometrist and our team will carry out a series of detailed tests to help us get as much information as possible about your child’s eyes. If your child is able, these may include:

1. Depth Perception (Stereoacuity)

Stereoacuity is a measure of fine depth discrimination. This test has proven to be an effective and easy-to-use method of screening vision for all ages. They help to identify vision problems and conduct stereopsis, amblyopia, suppression, and strabismus testing, each of which can impede a child’s development and performance.

2. Colour Vision

The Ishihara color test, which consists of a series of pictures of colored spots, is the test most often used to diagnose red–green color deficiencies.

A more in-depth test that can be used is the Farnsworth D15. Each D15 set contains a reference disc and fifteen numbered discs, which make up an incomplete color circle. Following an attempt to sequentially arrange the discs by the patient, evaluation determines red-green or yellow-blue deficiencies.

3. Auto-refraction/keratometry (iProfiler)

The information from the autorefractor gives your optometrist a good idea of what your vision needs are. When they ask you to look at a chart through different lenses, they’re further refining their understanding of how well you see. The autorefractor gives them a good idea of what lens strength to offer you. This isn’t always accurate or possible with children which is why your optometrist performs retinoscopy. Retinoscopy is a manual method to determine one’s prescription. It involves shining a light into your eye and based on the pupil reflex the optometrist can determine what your prescription is. To further increase the accuracy it is common to dilate children before checking their prescription.

The instrument also measures the shape of the central cornea (keratometry).

4. Optomap starting at age 5

Focal Point has made the Optomap retina scan free of charge for any child’s first scan. It can help spot peripheral retinal issues that can be missed as not all children can cooperate during the optometrists retinal exam. This initial scan provides a baseline retinal image to compare as your child grows. We encourage you to continue with future Optomap scans as we monitor your child’s eye health and vision.

5. Eye pressure measurement starting at age 12 (iCare)

This “puff-less” instrument also measures your internal eye pressure (IOP). It measures your IOP without the puff of air, as with the non-contact tonometer. You can request this test over the “puff of air” test if you prefer.

6. Frequency Doubling Technology (FDT) (15+)

The FDT measures your central and side vision using a variety of light patterns. It has been instrumental in detecting early eye disease and neurological (brain) disease.

7. Lipiscan (13+)

This non-invasive infrared camera images the meibomian glands. Meibomian glands sit within your eyelids and produce oils which form the outermost, or top, layer of your tears. Damage to, or loss of, these glands can lead to dry eye disease.

8. Visual Acuity, Eye Coordination

Your optometrist will evaluate how well your child’s eyes are seeing with and without glasses. When you have two eyes, teamwork is important. Your optometrist will examine how well your child’s eyes work together and how they process visual information.

9. Ocular Health Assessment

Using a biomicroscope and other hand help instruments your optometrist can view the external and internal structures of your child’s eyes